Dr Pádraig Kitterick

Padraig Kitterick

Associate Professor in Hearing Sciences, Research Lead (Severe-to-profound hearing loss)

Pádraig is an Associate Professor in Hearing Sciences and Research Lead for Severe-to-profound hearing loss.

Pádraig graduated from the Conservatory of Music and Drama in Dublin where he completed a Bachelor in Music Performance and subsequently received a Fellowship of Trinity College London in Piano. He then studied at the University of York where he completed an MSc in Music Technology and later gained his PhD in Psychology in 2008 by examining how deficiencies in cognition that occur as part of the natural ageing process may contribute to difficulties with listening to what one person is saying when many other people are speaking at the same time. Following the completion of his PhD, Pádraig held a post-doctoral research fellowship in the Department of Psychology in the University of York, carrying out a programme of research on spatial listening skills in normally-hearing and hearing-impaired populations, including users of hearing aids and cochlear implants. Pádraig joined the NIHR Nottingham Hearing BRU as a senior research fellow in 2012.

Expertise summary

Pádraig’s research has focussed on measuring skills in spatial listening in post-lingually deafened adult users of cochlear implants, both in the laboratory and as part of their routine clinical care, and on assessing the benefits to spatial listening from the preservation of residual acoustic hearing in the non-implanted ear of unilaterally-implanted individuals. His research has also focussed on the translation of laboratory research into tools that can be used to monitor outcomes with cochlear implants in the clinic. Working with clinicians and audiologists, Pádraig has developed an apparatus for the routine clinical evaluation of spatial listening skills in adults and children who use cochlear implants which is now in use in cochlear implant centres around the UK. Pádraig has also conducted research on the roles of attention and cognition in hearing out one talker among many using neuro-imaging techniques such as magneto-encephalography and magnetic resonance imaging.