Seminars

Members of the general public are welcome to attend our seminars. However space is limited so if you would like to attend, please ring Sandra Smith at least 24 hours prior to the seminar on 0115 823 2634 to reserve a place. If Sandra Smith is unavailable contact Jan Kelly on 0115 823 2617 or contact reception on 0115 823 2600.

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27 June 2016

PPI Focused Seminar

Presenter(s): Joanna Crocker, Rosamund Snow
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

University of Oxford

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20 June 2016

Scientists who share: What digital science communication can do for you

Presenter(s): Mr Antony Poveda
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

  1. Abstract


TBA

Biography


Antony is part of the team at Gallomanor Communciations where he helps to wrangle and evaluate the I’m a Scientist event and other projects. His background is originally in neuroscience, and he recently completed a Masters in Science Communication at UWE. See what the team is up to on Twitter @imascientist.

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06 June 2016

TBC

Presenter(s): Dr Caroline Witton
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

TBC

(Aston Brain Centre)

 

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24 May 2016

Neuroimaging of the Emergence of Cognition in Infants and its Clinical Applications

Presenter(s): Dr Rhodri Cusack
Time: 16.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract: Assessing emerging cognition is challenging, as infants can’t communicate what they know, and different behavioural protocols have yielded inconsistent findings. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect brain functions even when they do not manifest in behaviour, and has the potential for rich insight on infant brain development. With particular focus on the auditory-language and motor systems, we used diffusion tractography, functional connectivity, and functional MRI to study how cognitive systems develop in healthy infants. The results contradict widely held models, and disrupt current understanding of the emergence of these systems. Additionally, MRI of infant cognition holds great clinical potential. We studied how brain function was altered in infants from the neonatal intensive care unit that were at risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. We found that functional MRI at 40 weeks post-menstrual age provides a biomarker that can predict motor skill later in the first year. In summary, MRI has opened a valuable window onto emerging cognition, and how it is disrupted by brain injury.

 

Please Note this Seminar is being held in A1 Psychology Building, University of Nottingham main campus 

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23 May 2016

TBC

Presenter(s): Dr Richard Riley
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

TBC

(Keele University)

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16 May 2016

TBC

Presenter(s): Dr Tim Green
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

TBC

(University College London)

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10 May 2016

The Mind’s Ear: Normal and Abnormal Auditory Cognition

Presenter(s): Dr Tim Griffiths
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract
This talk concerns auditory cognition: the mechanism by which the brain allows us to understand the acoustic world around us. I will develop a framework for normal auditory cognition based on the systematic representation of sensory cues in the pathway up to and including auditory cortex, the representation of sound percepts in higher auditory cortex, figure ground analysis in a network including parietal cortex, and working memory for sound (the process of keeping a sound ‘in mind’) requiring auditory cortex, frontal cortex and hippocampus. Abnormal auditory cognition can be understood as aberrant processing within such a framework. I will consider tinnitus, musical hallucinations, acquired central deafness, acquired auditory agnosia and congenital auditory agnosia.


Biography
Timothy Griffiths is Wellcome Senior Clinical Fellow and Professor of Cognitive Neurology at Newcastle University. His research concerns human auditory cognition: how we make sense of the acoustic world.  He studies deficits in auditory cognition in patients with brain lesions, functional imaging data (fMRI and MEG) from normal subjects, and depth-electrode data from the auditory cortex of neurosurgical patients. The functional imaging is carried out at the Wellcome Trust Centre for NeuroImaging in London, where he is a Principal, and the depth electrode data is acquired at Iowa where he is adjunct Professor. These studies allow inference about normal auditory cognition. Other work explores abnormal auditory cognition in developmental and degenerative disorders, and brain mechanisms for tinnitus and auditory hallucinations.
Website: http://www.fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk/~tgriff/


Host: Rebecca Dewey (rebecca.dewey [at] nottingham.ac.uk)

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25 April 2016

TBC

Presenter(s): Dr Hannah Cooper
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

(UCL Institute of Child Health)

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18 April 2016

TBC

Presenter(s): Professor Tom Dening
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

TBC

(University of Nottingham)

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11 April 2016

Real Partnership with the Regions’ Communities

Presenter(s): Paula Wray
Time:
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Biography


Paula Wray is the Public involvement Programme Lead for the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) East Midlands.  Paula has a strategic role ensuring that the public involvement and stakeholder engagement is central to the CLAHRC and its projects.  She chairs the Patient and Public Partners’ Council and co-leads the East Midlands Centre for Black and Minority Ethnic Health to facilitate and support inclusive and diverse engagement providing a more ground up direction for the organisation.

 

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