Seminars

Members of the general public are welcome to attend our seminars. However space is limited so if you would like to attend, please ring Sandra Smith at least 24 hours prior to the seminar on 0115 823 2634 to reserve a place. If Sandra Smith is unavailable contact Jan Kelly on 0115 823 2617 or contact reception on 0115 823 2600.

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21 November 2016

Maximising the impact of research effort by standardising outcomes in hearing research: "More bang for your buck"

Presenter(s): Professor Iain Bruce
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

A recent editorial in the British Medical Journal has emphasised the critical importance of “establishing and requiring core outcomes to enable combination of data from multiple studies” under the banner of promoting the benefits of ‘big data’. Ultimately, it is envisaged that “…studies that are designed, conducted, and reported using a common language will have a greater scientific value because the datasets can be truthfully combined" (Koroshetz 2015). Heterogeneity of choice of outcome measurement between studies significantly lessens the ability to combine the results of studies in a clinical meaningful manner. If effectiveness studies do not report consistent outcome measures using agreed definitions and corresponding measurement instruments, their results cannot be combined and/or contrasted. Heterogeneity makes data synthesis in systematic reviews inherently difficult.  Outcome reporting bias (ORB) occurs when only a selection of the 'significant' or 'positive' findings are reported resulting in a biased representation of the trial results. A solution to this problem is the standardisation of outcome measurement through the development of ‘core outcome sets’ (COS). A COS is an agreed minimum set of outcomes that should be measured and reported in all trials in a specific condition. The ideal COS would combine both patient/parent/carer and clinician opinion and could be used in the design of all subsequent clinical studies in the field. A COS is a recommendation of ‘what’ should be measured and reported in all trials in a specific area ( http://www.comet-initiative.org). Accompanying the domains in the COS should be an appropriate method to quantify the outcome (the ‘measurement instrument’ set) - ‘how’ - in addition to a recommendation for the timing of its use - ‘when’. Ultimately, standardizing ‘what’, ‘how’ and ‘when’ outcomes should be measured in research would significantly improve overall trial design and enable more reliable synthesis of evidence, in order to produce robust recommendations for optimal clinical practice.

Biography:

Iain has worked as a Consultant Paediatric Otolaryngologist at the Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital since 2009 and is the Honorary Professor of Paediatric Otolaryngology, MAHSC, University of Manchester. He is a member of the Standing Scientific Committee of the ESPO and the council of the British Association of Paediatric Otolaryngology (BAPO). He is an Associate Director of the NIHR/Wellcome Manchester Children's CRF. His research interests complement his clinical sub-specialisations, focusing on childhood hearing loss, implantable hearing aids and airway obstruction in children. He is an assistant editor for Cochlear Implants International and member of the International Editorial Board for Clinical Otolaryngology.

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17 October 2016

3D-game for TUNing hEarINg aids (3D Tune-In): Connecting Hearing Aid Stakeholders with Digital Game Designers

Presenter(s): Dr Lorenzo Picinali
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

3D Tune-In is a Horizon 2020 funded project that brings together the relevant stakeholders from traditional gaming industries (SMEs - Reactify, Vianet, XTeam, Nerlaska), academic institutes (Imperial College London, De Montfort University, the University of Nottingham, the University of Malaga); a large European hearing aid manufacturer (GN); and hearing communities (through Associations - Extra Care, Hearing Link, Action Deafness, Accesibilidad y Personas Sordas and Ente Nazionale Sordi) to produce digital games in the field of hearing aid technologies and hearing loss in children and older adults, addressing social inclusion, generating new markets and creating job opportunities.

The project aims to develop digital games and applications that utilise 3D visual and audio technologies, and which are specifically targeted towards the population of hearing aid users in Europe. These serious and leisure games and applications will contribute towards educating hearing aid users about the various functionalities of their hearing aids and how a more accurate calibration of these functionalities might contribute to a better quality of hearing in different sound environments. They will also contribute towards educating the wider population about hearing loss issues and how hearing loss can impact on daily life. Moreover, a novel audio rendering engine specifically directed towards individuals with hearing loss is being developed (the 3D Tune-In Toolkit) in order to create a series of components (e.g. 3D audio engine, hearing aid and hearing loss simulators, etc) to be used in the games and applications.

The project is in the middle of the second year of activity in which game and application designs are being developed and refined through an iterative process involving the input of all relevant stakeholders. In the seminar the project will be described in further detail, focussing on the 3D Tune-In Toolkit (including a brief overview of a side-study on Head Related Transfer Function adaptation) and on the 3D Tune-In Applications. Two demos will be available to the audience after the presentation.

Biography
Lorenzo Picinali is a Senior Lecturer in Audio Experience Design, and the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Dyson School of Design Engineering. In the past years he has worked in Italy (Università degli Studi di Milano), France (LIMSI-CNRS and IRCAM) and UK (De Montfort University) on projects related with 3D binaural sound rendering, interactive applications for the blind, audiology and audiometric techniques, hearing aids technology, audio and haptic interaction and, more in general, acoustical virtual and augmented reality. Lorenzo is currently the module leader for DE1-MEM Engineering Mathematics, and a tutor for the GID and IDE MA/MSc programs at Imperial College London, in collaboration with the Royal College of Arts. He is the scientific coordinator of the EU-H2020 3D Tune-In research project.

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03 October 2016

Understanding language comprehension: evidence from neural patterns and voxel wise responses

Presenter(s): Dr Samuel Evans
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract 

Neuroimaging studies show that auditory information is processed within multiple streams of processing in the human brain.  These streams include a hierarchically organised ventral pathway that extracts meaning from auditory signals and a dorsal stream that integrates perception and production.  To date, our understanding of the function of these processing streams has predominantly come from mass univariate general linear modelling.  This approach has achieved a great deal in mapping the basic architecture of the speech perception system.  However, recent advances in neuroimaging analyses that use patterns of activity rather than single voxel responses, allow an arguably richer description of neural activity that provide additional insights into brain function.  In this talk, results from fMRI studies of comprehension will be presented showing how analyses exploiting neural patterns  can be used to confirm and extend understanding of the neural systems supporting perception.

Biography

Samuel Evans originally trained as a speech and language therapist. He received his PhD from the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL, on the neural basis of speech perception. Since then he has spent time working at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit in Cambridge and the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at UCL.  His work investigates the neural basis of language comprehension and production using fMRI.  He combines univariate and multivariate methods to understand how these systems work and how they are modulated by intrinsic (e.g. language impairment) and extrinsic (e.g. the auditory environment) factors.

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11 July 2016

Neural strategies for compensating for asymmetric hearing loss

Presenter(s): Andrew King
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract


TBA

Biography


Andrew King is a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow and Professor of Neurophysiology at the University of Oxford. He heads the Auditory Neuroscience Group in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics and is also the Director of the Wellcome Trust Doctoral Training Programme in Neuroscience at Oxford and a Fellow of Merton College. He received his undergraduate training in physiology at King’s College London and a PhD from the National Institute for Medical Research. He then moved to Oxford, where he has been supported by fellowships from the Science and Engineering Research Council, the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine and the Wellcome Trust. He has also been a visiting scientist at the Eye Research Institute in Boston. In 2011, he was elected a Fellow of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences.


Host: Rebecca Dewey (rebecca.dewey [at] nottingham.ac.uk)

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27 June 2016

PPI Focused Seminar

Presenter(s): Joanna Crocker, Rosamund Snow
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

University of Oxford

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20 June 2016

Scientists who share: What digital science communication can do for you

Presenter(s): Mr Antony Poveda
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

  1. Abstract


TBA

Biography


Antony is part of the team at Gallomanor Communciations where he helps to wrangle and evaluate the I’m a Scientist event and other projects. His background is originally in neuroscience, and he recently completed a Masters in Science Communication at UWE. See what the team is up to on Twitter @imascientist.

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06 June 2016

TBC

Presenter(s): Dr Caroline Witton
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

TBC

(Aston Brain Centre)

 

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24 May 2016

Neuroimaging of the Emergence of Cognition in Infants and its Clinical Applications

Presenter(s): Dr Rhodri Cusack
Time: 16.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract: Assessing emerging cognition is challenging, as infants can’t communicate what they know, and different behavioural protocols have yielded inconsistent findings. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect brain functions even when they do not manifest in behaviour, and has the potential for rich insight on infant brain development. With particular focus on the auditory-language and motor systems, we used diffusion tractography, functional connectivity, and functional MRI to study how cognitive systems develop in healthy infants. The results contradict widely held models, and disrupt current understanding of the emergence of these systems. Additionally, MRI of infant cognition holds great clinical potential. We studied how brain function was altered in infants from the neonatal intensive care unit that were at risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. We found that functional MRI at 40 weeks post-menstrual age provides a biomarker that can predict motor skill later in the first year. In summary, MRI has opened a valuable window onto emerging cognition, and how it is disrupted by brain injury.

 

Please Note this Seminar is being held in A1 Psychology Building, University of Nottingham main campus 

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23 May 2016

TBC

Presenter(s): Dr Richard Riley
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

TBC

(Keele University)

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16 May 2016

TBC

Presenter(s): Dr Tim Green
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

TBC

(University College London)

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