Seminars

Members of the general public are welcome to attend our seminars. However space is limited so if you would like to attend, please ring Sandra Smith at least 24 hours prior to the seminar on 0115 823 2634 to reserve a place. If Sandra Smith is unavailable contact Jan Kelly on 0115 823 2617 or contact reception on 0115 823 2600.

« Prev Page 12345 Next Page »

15 February 2016

A cognitive role for the auditory cortex of deaf individuals

Presenter(s): Dr Velia Cardin
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract
TBA

Biography
Dr. Velia Cardin is a neuroscientist whose research focuses on neural plasticity and deafness. She currently works at DCAL, where in collaboration with the University of Linköping, Sweden, she has shown that sensory and cognitive mechanisms cause reorganisation in segregated brain regions, preserving the nature of the cortical processing but adapting to a different sensory input. This is fundamental in terms of understanding how we obtain meaningful information from sensory inputs – it is the kind of computation the brain is capable of performing that is relevant, rather than the nature of the information itself.  Her work has profound implications for artificial intelligence and robotics, as well as education and policy with respect to language choices in deaf children.
More information can also be found here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/dcal/team/accordion/associatesadmin/veliacardin
Host: Rebecca Dewey (rebecca.dewey[at] nottingham.ac.uk)

Share this seminar

08 February 2016

Working Memory Training

Presenter(s): Dr Joni Holmes
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract
TBA

Biography
Joni completed both her first degree and Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Durham, before moving to Leeds Metropolitan University as a Lecturer in Psychology in 2005. She moved to the University of York to work as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Centre for Working Memory and Learning in 2006, where she worked on a project investigating the cognitive profiles of children with disorders of memory and attention. Joni joined Northumbria University as a Senior Lecturer in Psychology in January 2009, before moving to the Medical Research Council’s Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit in Cambridge in August 2011. She continues to work there as a Senior Investigator Scientist investigating both the causes and consequences of memory problems in children and the cognitive training.
Host: Mel Ferguson (melanie.ferguson [at] nottingham.ac.uk)

Share this seminar

08 February 2016

Working Memory Training

Presenter(s): Dr Joni Holmes
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

TBA

Biography
Joni completed both her first degree and Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Durham, before moving to Leeds Metropolitan University as a Lecturer in Psychology in 2005. She moved to the University of York to work as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Centre for Working Memory and Learning in 2006, where she worked on a project investigating the cognitive profiles of children with disorders of memory and attention. Joni joined Northumbria University as a Senior Lecturer in Psychology in January 2009, before moving to the Medical Research Council’s Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit in Cambridge in August 2011. She continues to work there as a Senior Investigator Scientist investigating both the causes and consequences of memory problems in children and the cognitive training.

Share this seminar

01 February 2016

TBC

Presenter(s): Dr Bruno Giordano
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

(University of Glasgow)

Share this seminar

18 January 2016

Insights and inconsistencies from studying sound perception in animal models

Presenter(s): Dr Kerry Walker
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract

Animal models are essential to auditory neuroscience, as they allow us to probe the biological basis of hearing in ways that are not possible in human listeners. For decades, results from microelectrode recording studies have informed us about how individual neurons in the brain encode sound properties as patterns of action potentials. More recently, 2-photon calcium imaging has provided novel insights into neural representations of sounds by allowing us to record the responses of up to hundreds of individual neurons simultaneously. But in comparing these results to our own experience of sound, important perceptual differences across species are too often left unexplored. I will discuss this in light of my own research into pitch perception in ferrets and auditory space encoding in mice. Our results have shown that auditory cortical neurons predict ferrets’ behavioural decisions on a pitch discrimination task, and that these decisions may be based on a specialized subset of cortical neurons. But we further show that the cognitive and perceptual underpinnings of ferret pitch decisions are quite different from our own. Our 2-photon imaging studies in mice suggest that auditory space representations in auditory cortex may be fundamentally different in rats and mice, wherein only the former have a purely contralaterally-tuned auditory cortex. These results all emphasize the necessity of careful psychophysical investigations that help us interpret physiological studies in animal models of hearing.

Biography

I did my undergraduate studies in Newfoundland, where I grew up (BSc (hon.) in Behavioural Neuroscience, Dept. of Psychology, Memorial University). I then completed an MSc in Neuroscience in Nova Scotia (Dept. of Psychology, Dalhousie University), under the supervision of Prof Dennis Phillips. Finally, I completed my doctorate at the University of Oxford (Dept. of Physiology, Anatomy & Genetics) with Prof Jan Schupp and Prof Andy King. I worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher for Prof King in the Auditory Neuroscience Group for 3 years, and am now running an independent research group as a DPAG Early Career Research Fellow. My current research is primarily funded by a BBSRC New Investigator Grant, and involves a combination of behavioural, electrophysiology, and 2-photon imaging studies in ferrets and mice. Our investigations aim to understand the neural basis of pitch perception, sound localization, and stream segregation. I am also a Fellow of St. Catherine’s College (University of Oxford), where I direct the undergraduate course in Biomedical Sciences.

Share this seminar

11 January 2016

More than a feeling: the informed application of music…

Presenter(s): Dr Victoria Williamson
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Full Title: More than a feeling: the informed application of music in everyday and extraordinary wellbeing challenges

Abstract 

Wellbeing is a state defined by a sense of comfort, achievement, health and happiness. Challenges to our wellbeing state span the life course and can include both the everyday (sleep disturbance, learning a new skill) and the extraordinary (physical or mental illness). There are multiple, universal examples of the intuitive use of music to boost wellbeing outcomes. The first question - why might music help in these situations? The second question - can we optimise any positive effects? Today’s talk will introduce some of the mechanisms behind the impact of music on wellbeing, and give examples of what is possible when music is employed in an informed way to remediate everyday and extraordinary life challenges. In particular, I will discuss research into the effect of music on language and memory ability, and the application of music inter ventions for people living with aphasia or dementia.

Biography

My research interests can be summarised by the term ‘Applied Music Psychology’. This means that I am keen to explore how music impacts on our behaviours, abilities, and brain responses, and to learn how we can best interact with music to support our activities in the real world.
I completed my degree in Psychology at the University of York (UK) in 2004, where I studied the effect of music on computer game performance. I then gained an MA in the Psychology of Music at the University of Sheffield where I investigated musical memory and the impact of music on driving behaviour. Finally, I was awarded a University of York Doctoral Studentship to study musical memory and the impacts of musical expertise on cognition, with Profs. Alan Baddeley and Graham Hitch.
In 2008 I completed my doctorate and won the ESRC Fellowship Award that allowed me to move to Goldsmiths and study memory function in people with congenital amusia (tone deafness). While there I also completed my own British Academy grant entitled “What causes earworms?” and was co-investigator on a British Academy grant investigating music and novel word learning.
I spent 2011-12 working as a lecturer and course co-director of the MSc in Music, Mind and Brain at Goldsmiths. From 2012-2013, I worked as a Leverhulme Research Associate on a project investigating potential causes and cures of earworms (tunes that get stuck in the head).
In 2013 I moved to Switzerland to work as Visiting Professor of Performance Science at the Hochschule Luzern – Musik, Lucerne University of Applied Science and Arts. In 2014 I began my role as Vice Chancellor’s Fellow for the Arts and Humanities (Music) at the University of Sheffield. In 2014-2015 I am the Visiting Fellow at the School of Advanced Study (University of London).
 

Share this seminar

04 January 2016

TBC

Presenter(s): Sarah Allen
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

(Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust)

Share this seminar

07 December 2015

High density near infrared spectroscopy - Using ATLAS based reconstructions

Presenter(s): Dr Michael Clancy
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

High density near infrared spectroscopy - Using ATLAS based reconstructions to improve quantitative accuracy of cerebral oxygenation values

Abstract

Within the context of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has the potential to provide a means of monitoring cerebral oxygenation in real time. However as NIRS tends to focus on relative changes in oxygenation from a baseline measurement it is not ready for use in this clinical application as no healthy baseline reading can be obtained from a potentially compromised brain. The focus of this research is to demonstrate that hybridisation of existing near infrared probe designs and reconstruction techniques can produce a device that can be used to monitor oxygen saturation in the injured brain without the need for a normative baseline measurement. Using registered Atlas models in simulation, we outline a method by which the quantitative accuracy and practicality of near infrared spectroscopy, for specific use in monitoring the injured brain, may be improved.

Biography

Originally my undergraduate degree was in Astrophysics at the University of Birmingham. In 2012 I started working in the Doctoral Training Centre for Physical Sciences of Imaging in the Biomedical Sciences (PSIBS) where my PhD focuses on the application of near infrared spectroscopy to the monitoring of patients with traumatic brain injury.

Host: Rebecca Dewey (rebecca.dewey [at] nottingham.ac.uk)

Share this seminar

30 November 2015

TBC

Presenter(s): Dr Fred Dick
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

(Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck, University of London)

Share this seminar

23 November 2015

Developing a new clinical test to quantify listening effort in cochlear implant users

Presenter(s): Ms Helen Willis
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract

Listening effort is known to lead to debilitative long term health consequences for people who are hearing impaired. Even mild degrees of hearing impairment lead to increased levels of listening effort but this is little appreciated by physicians, parents and teachers. The effort needed to listen is similarly easy to dismiss for cochlear implant (CI) users: as soon as the CI is implanted, recipients may be thought to be free of listening problems because their audiograms become similar to those seen with minimal hearing loss. Whilst there is active research on listening effort, much remains to be understood and there are no clinically applicable measures of listening effort. Current emphasis in clinical assessment for cochlear implant patients is on speech comprehension, although the importance of listening effort is being increasingly recognised by researchers. Considering the health consequences associated with chronic increased listening effort, processing strategies that reduce this listening effort in the cochlear implant population could be just as beneficial as those that improve speech comprehension. This PhD project will attempt to create a clinical test capable of quantifying listening effort in cochlear implant users (with validation provided by use of the pupillometry technique, as well as extensive assays of hearing ability and cognitive, executive and intellectual function). Data from the pilot of the first attempt of creating such a test will be discussed.

Biography


Helen recently graduated from Oxford University (St. John’s College) with a First Class Honours in Physiology and Psychology and also a MSc in Neuroscience. She is now completing her first year of a doctorate at University College London, with Prof. Stuart Rosen and Dr. Deborah Vickers as supervisors and funding jointly provided by Action on Hearing Loss and Cochlear UK. Being an experienced cochlear implant user of 20 years (having been totally deafened by meningitis at the age of 19 months), Helen is hoping to use her personal experience and neuroscience training to help execute research that will contribute to the field of listening effort, and most importantly of all, help all cochlear implant users like herself gain optimal benefit from the cochlear implant technology.

Share this seminar

« Prev Page 12345 Next Page »