Seminars

Members of the general public are welcome to attend our seminars. However space is limited so if you would like to attend, please ring Sandra Smith at least 24 hours prior to the seminar on 0115 823 2634 to reserve a place. If Sandra Smith is unavailable contact Jan Kelly on 0115 823 2617 or contact reception on 0115 823 2600.

« Prev Page 12345 Next Page »

18 April 2016

TBC

Presenter(s): Professor Tom Dening
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

TBC

(University of Nottingham)

Share this seminar

11 April 2016

Real Partnership with the Regions’ Communities

Presenter(s): Paula Wray
Time:
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Biography


Paula Wray is the Public involvement Programme Lead for the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) East Midlands.  Paula has a strategic role ensuring that the public involvement and stakeholder engagement is central to the CLAHRC and its projects.  She chairs the Patient and Public Partners’ Council and co-leads the East Midlands Centre for Black and Minority Ethnic Health to facilitate and support inclusive and diverse engagement providing a more ground up direction for the organisation.

 

Share this seminar

04 April 2016

Selectivity and Invariance in Auditory System

Presenter(s): Dr Andrei Kozlov
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

TBA

Biography
Dr. Kozlov’s research background is in sensory neuroscience and biophysics. Andrei obtained a PhD from Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg in the area of ion channel biophysics. During his first postdoc (ESPCI, Paris) he investigated how astrocytes modulate neural circuits in the central nervous system. Andrei’s research in sensory neuroscience has focused on auditory system. He examined the biophysics of mechanoelectrical transduction in the inner ear (at the Rockefeller University, New York), and investigated computations in auditory cortex (at the University of California, San Diego). Dr. Kozlov joined in the fall of 2014 the Department of Bioengineering at Imperial College London, where he founded the Laboratory of Auditory Neuroscience and Biophysics. Research interests of this new laboratory are centred on two areas: how the inner ear converts sounds into electrical signals, and how auditory cortex interprets these signals.

Share this seminar

16 March 2016

3D-game for Tuning Hearing aids (3D Tune-In): Connecting Hearing Aid Stakeholders with Digital Game

Presenter(s): Dr Madeline Hallewell, Dr Lorenzo Picinali
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

3D Tune-In is a Horizon 2020 funded project that brings together the relevant stakeholders from traditional gaming industries (SMEs - Reactify, Vianet, XTeam, Nerlaska), academic institutes (Imperial College London, De Montfort University, the University of Nottingham, the University of Malaga); a large European hearing aid manufacturer (GN); and hearing communities (through Associations - Extra Care, Hearing Link, Action Deafness, Accesibilidad y Personas Sordas and Ente Nazionale Sordi) to produce digital games in the field of hearing aid technologies and hearing loss in children and older adults, addressing social inclusion, generating new markets and creating job opportunities.
The project aims to develop digital games and applications that utilise 3D visual and audio technologies, and which are specifically targeted towards the population of hearing aid users in Europe. These serious and leisure games and applications will contribuite towards educating hearing aid users about the various functionalities of their hearing aids and how a more accurate calibration of these functionalities might contribute to a better quality of hearing in different sound environments. They will also contribute towards educating the wider population about hearing loss issues and how hearing loss can impact on daily life. Moreover, novel audio and visual rendering engines specifically directed towards individuals with hearing loss are being developed in order to create a toolkit of components to be used in the games and applications.
The project is entering its second year of activity in which game and application designs are being developed and refined through an iterative process involving the input of all relevant stakeholders. In the seminar we will describe the project in further detail, focussing on the processes involved in eliciting user requirements from hearing aid users, communication partners, audiologists and those without hearing loss, and how their needs are being communicated to designers.

Share this seminar

14 March 2016

Assessing language lateralisation in children born profoundly deaf using functional transcranial

Presenter(s): Dr Heather Payne
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Most adults show left lateralisation for speech production (Price, 2012). Developmental research suggests that asymmetries in early auditory areas, linked to the low-level acoustic properties of speech, may be a precursor to left-lateralized language processes later in development (Minagawa-Kawai et al.,2011). Children born deaf, regardless of amplification, will inevitably experience a drastically different spoken language input to hearing children. Assessing hemispheric dominance in deaf children allows us to test the relevance of auditory experience on language lateralization.
Measuring neural activity in deaf children has been difficult to date due to incompatibility between imaging techniques and cochlear implants. Here we use functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) which is a safe and cost-effective way of assessing gross differences in hemispheric activity during cognitive tasks (Deppe et al.,2004).
In this talk, I will explain how we used fTCD to measure changes in cerebral blood flow velocity in 24 school-aged children (mean age 7 years 9 months) born severely or profoundly deaf (>70dB loss in better ear) whist they described an animated story (Bishop et al., 2009). I will discuss the relationship between strength of lateralisation, behavioural performance, and language modality. This study is a first step in attempting to measure neurobiological processes involved in language production in this understudied paediatric population.

Share this seminar

07 March 2016

Human Echolocation – Acoustic Signals and Sampling Behaviour

Presenter(s): Dr Lore Thaler
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

TBA

Biography
Lore Thaler is a lecturer at Durham University in the United Kingdom. Her research focuses on human echolocation and vision. She can be contacted at lore.thaler@durham.ac.uk.

Share this seminar

29 February 2016

Homeostatic plasticity at a cellular level and its link to tinnitus

Presenter(s): Dr Martine Hamann
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract
TBA

Biography
Martine Hamann held a RCUK Research Fellowship before becoming a University Lecturer in Neurosciences at the University of Leicester. Before joining the University of Leicester, she worked as a post doc at UCL (studying ischaemia induced glutamate release), and did her PhD at the Medical University Centre in Geneva (on mechanisms triggering differentiation of muscle stem cells). Her current studies aim at finding biomarkers for pathogenic processes linked to hearing loss and tinnitus, and providing molecular targets towards effective treatment against those auditory deficits. Her collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline and Autifony Therapeutics allowed showing the reduced function of Kv3 channels in the auditory brainstem, following noise exposure. This study has led Autifony Therapeutics to validate K+ channel modulators as potential tools against hearing loss or tinnitus. Her current projects involve studying the electrophysiological properties of K+ channel positive modulators in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (funded by MRC-Autifony Therapeutics), tinnitus screening in rodent models using the gap-prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (funded by Action on Hearing Loss), studying genetic biomarkers for hearing loss and tinnitus (British Tinnitus Association).

 

Host: Rebecca Dewey (rebecca.dewey [at] nottingham.ac.uk)

Share this seminar

22 February 2016

Feedforward and feedback processes in perception and decision making

Presenter(s): Dr Markus Bauer
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract
TBA

Biography
Following two PostDocs at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging/Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at UCL in London and the Max-Planck Institute in Berlin, I joined the University of Nottingham to pursue my research as assistant professor.
My research currently has mainly two (related) foci:
On the one hand I am interested how chemical neuromodulators can tune neuronal information processing and thereby enable us to adapt to a range of environmental situations but are also likely to mediate interindividual differences in behaviour and cognition.
On the other hand I am interested in how our brain combines previously learned information (e.g. long term episodic memory and semantic memory) or higher level goals with the sensory signals provided by our instantaneous environment during perception and decision making.
It is well known that the superior capabilities of the human mind relies particularly on the efficient use and combination of these types of ‘information’, yet the neuronal mechanisms underlying its integration are currently debated. One aspect of particular relevance here are oscillatory synchronization phenomena - brain waves - that may have specific roles for communicating such bottom-up and top-down driven signals between different levels of the cortical hierarchy.


Host: Rebecca Dewey (rebecca.dewey[at] nottingham.ac.uk)

Share this seminar

15 February 2016

A cognitive role for the auditory cortex of deaf individuals

Presenter(s): Dr Velia Cardin
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract
TBA

Biography
Dr. Velia Cardin is a neuroscientist whose research focuses on neural plasticity and deafness. She currently works at DCAL, where in collaboration with the University of Linköping, Sweden, she has shown that sensory and cognitive mechanisms cause reorganisation in segregated brain regions, preserving the nature of the cortical processing but adapting to a different sensory input. This is fundamental in terms of understanding how we obtain meaningful information from sensory inputs – it is the kind of computation the brain is capable of performing that is relevant, rather than the nature of the information itself.  Her work has profound implications for artificial intelligence and robotics, as well as education and policy with respect to language choices in deaf children.
More information can also be found here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/dcal/team/accordion/associatesadmin/veliacardin
Host: Rebecca Dewey (rebecca.dewey[at] nottingham.ac.uk)

Share this seminar

08 February 2016

Working Memory Training

Presenter(s): Dr Joni Holmes
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract
TBA

Biography
Joni completed both her first degree and Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Durham, before moving to Leeds Metropolitan University as a Lecturer in Psychology in 2005. She moved to the University of York to work as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Centre for Working Memory and Learning in 2006, where she worked on a project investigating the cognitive profiles of children with disorders of memory and attention. Joni joined Northumbria University as a Senior Lecturer in Psychology in January 2009, before moving to the Medical Research Council’s Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit in Cambridge in August 2011. She continues to work there as a Senior Investigator Scientist investigating both the causes and consequences of memory problems in children and the cognitive training.
Host: Mel Ferguson (melanie.ferguson [at] nottingham.ac.uk)

Share this seminar

« Prev Page 12345 Next Page »