Seminars

Members of the general public are welcome to attend our seminars. However space is limited so if you would like to attend, please ring Sandra Smith at least 24 hours prior to the seminar on 0115 823 2634 to reserve a place. If Sandra Smith is unavailable contact Jan Kelly on 0115 823 2617 or contact reception on 0115 823 2600.

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10 December 2012

Communicating research effectively

Presenter(s): Debs Storey
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Debs Storey's area of expertise is in Social Media and video production.  For this seminar, she is going to focus on how to use Facebook and Twitter (more in depth) to promote research, news, success stories etc.  Debs will also touch briefly on the use of video, blogging and LinkedIn. 

With a background in the Arts, Deb has over eight years of experience working in communications and marketing, the last 15 months specifically within higher education at The University of Nottingham. Her area of expertise is digital communications which is the focus of her current position as Digital Communications Manager in the Marketing, Communications and Recruitment department at the university. In this role she is responsible for managing and delivering a wide range of digital, social media and online content for the university’s UK, China and Malaysia campuses. She also produces high quality, impactful videos for the department and the wider university community in relation to recruitment, fundraising, research, business engagement and raising the global profile.

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03 December 2012

BSA lunch and learn eSeminar: The challenges of acclimatization to hearing aids

Presenter(s): Dr Piers Dawes
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Objectives: To describe the process of becoming accustomed to using hearing aids and factors which facilitate this process from the perspective of adult hearing aid users.
Design: A focus group was carried out in the north of England with adult hearing aid users (n=6). Hearing aid users owned hearing aids for less than two years and had used them at least once in the past three months. A topic guide and discussion exercises were used to elicit participant's views on becoming accustomed to hearing aid use. Focus group discussion was audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed according to qualitative content.
Results: Participants described becoming accustomed to hearing aids as a multi-factorial process which included adjusting to altered sensory input, managing practical matters such as cleaning and maintenance, discovering benefits and limitations of hearing aid use and managing the psychological impact of hearing aid use, such as on self-image. Factors that support this process included acceptance of hearing loss, persistence and consistent hearing aid use, support from friends, family and clinicians, and provision of information about hearing aids.
Conclusions: Becoming accustomed to hearing aids is a challenging multi-factorial process with both psychological and practical difficulties besides demands of adjusting to hearing aid input. Addressing these diverse challenges may offer novel ways of supporting new hearing aid users.

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28 November 2012

eLearning event: Deaf gerbils ‘hear again’ after stem cell cure

Presenter(s): Dr Marcelo Rivolta
Time: 17.30 – 18.30
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

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19 November 2012

Diagnosing Cochlear Dead Regions Using Auditory Steady-State Responses

Presenter(s): Dr Karolina Kluk-de-Kort
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

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08 November 2012

BSA lunch and learn eSeminar : Snake oil science: using ‘mild deception’ to

Presenter(s): K Munro
Time: 12.30 – 13.30
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Placebo effects— clinical responses associated with the expectations surrounding treatments rather than with any intrinsic property of the treatment—are wide-ranging and are recognized in medical research and clinical practice. Because of their importance, we examined placebo effects in a hearing aid trial using benefit measures typical of those used in clinical trials: speech in noise tests, sound quality ratings and overall personal preference. Our approach was to compare two hearing aids that were acoustically identical.  However, we used mild deception and informed the participants that they were comparing a conventional hearing aid with a new hearing aid.  On all of our measures, greater benefit was obtained with the ‘new’ hearing aid. Given the potential far reaching impact of these findings, we decided to repeat the study.  Once again, greater benefit was obtained with the ‘new’ hearing aid. These findings have important implications for hearing aid researchers. They suggest a need for caution when interpreting hearing aid trials which do not control for placebo effects. This is highly relevant to the UK National Health Service which currently spends around £60m/yr purchasing hearing aids. Our findings also have important implications for audiologists and hearing aid dispensers. It is likely that hearing aid users with positive expectations are more likely to experience benefit; therefore, the manipulation of expectations potentially offers an additional tool to maximize real benefit for audiology patients.

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08 November 2012

BSA lunch and learn eSeminar: Cell transplantation therapy and age related hearing loss

Presenter(s): Dr David Furness
Time: 12.30 – 13.30
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

As the causes of age-related hearing loss have become better understood, a number of possible targets for cell replacement or regeneration have been identified. The major effort has generally been expended in replacing the sensory hair cells of the organ of Corti to restore hearing.  However, it may well be equally fruitful to target other cells such as the spiral ganglion neurones that transmit the neural signal to the higher auditory pathway, or the spiral ligament fibrocytes that contribute to the homeostatic mechanism that maintains the endocochlear potential and ultimate ensure the survival of the hair cells themselves. I will review these possible targets, focussing particularly on the fibrocytes and their contribution, as well as ways they may be replaced to prevent age-related hearing loss.

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05 November 2012

Search strategies for systematic review

Presenter(s): Wendy Stanton
Time: 13.00 – 14.30
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

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29 October 2012

Ghosts in the machine

Presenter(s): John Phillips
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

I pose the question 'Is tinnitus unique to the sense of hearing?

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12 October 2012

Role of interhemispheric functional connectivity in auditory networks using combined fMRI and magnet

Presenter(s): Dr Jamila Andoh
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Role of interhemispheric functional connectivity in auditory networks using combined fMRI and magnetic stimulations

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08 October 2012

Magnetic injection of drug-coated nanoparticles to deliver therapy to the middle and inner ear

Presenter(s): Dr Benjamin Shapiro
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

We have invented, optimized, and tested in animal experiments a magnetic injection system that can safely deliver therapeutics to the inner and middle ear. In contrast to prior magnetic systems, which can only pull-on (attract) magnetic nanoparticles and so would have to pull through the width of the human head in order to delivery nano-therapy into the middle or inner ear, our system can push (it can magnetically inject). This allows us to use reasonable (safe, below FDA limits) magnetic fields over a short distance to delivery therapies into the middle or inner ear.

Figure 1: Schematic of our system to push magnetic nanoparticles into the inner ear. (a) The novel magnet injector creates a displaced magnetic node that pushes nanoparticles into the inner ear.  (b) Anticipated clinical use.

The inner ear is behind the blood-labyrinth barrier, thus drugs taken orally or injected systemically do not elute out of inner-ear blood vessels to reach inner ear tissue. It is thought that drugs delivered intra-tympanically into the middle ear also do not cross the oval window membranes sufficiently to effectively treat inner ear diseases. We have shown in preliminary rat experiments that our magnetic push forces can safely drive drug coated nanoparticles through the oval window membranes from the middle into the inner ear (without effecting hearing or causing other measurable side effects). Using steroid-coated nano-particles we have shown therapeutic effect for treatment of acute tinnitus and noise-induced hearing loss. We have also demonstrated that magnetic pushing can drive nano-particles through the tympanic membrane, providing a non-invasive alternative to syringe or laser intra-tympanic injection.

In this talk I will summarize how our magnetic system works, compare it to prior results (e.g. the magnetic delivery work of Kopke that used magnetic pull forces in guinea pigs), and present our preliminary animal data. I am looking forward to comments and input from clinicians during and after the talk.

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