Seminars

Members of the general public are welcome to attend our seminars. However space is limited so if you would like to attend, please ring Sandra Smith at least 24 hours prior to the seminar on 0115 823 2634 to reserve a place. If Sandra Smith is unavailable contact Jan Kelly on 0115 823 2617 or contact reception on 0115 823 2600.

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01 October 2012

Extracting and representing regularities in sound sequences

Presenter(s): Dr Maria Chait
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

The notion that auditory scene analysis is based on predictive processing has recently been receiving considerable attention.  According to this view, the auditory system continuously seeks to make sense of incoming information by searching for regularities within the arriving acoustic signal and forming predictive models concerning future input. The formation of such models allows the system to adapt to environment statistics, conserve resources, and optimize behaviour. I will present a series of psychophysics and MEG experiments which investigate listeners sensitivity to different forms of regularity in the context of auditory scene analysis tasks (e.g. detecting changes in the pattern of on-going sequences, segregating concurrent sequences, etc.) with the purpose of shedding light on the kinds of stimulus regularities to which we are very sensitive vs. those that are less perceptually salient.

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16 July 2012

The benefits of sign language for deaf people (and the risks of going without): Evidence from deaf s

Presenter(s): Dr Kearsy Cormier
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

The benefits of sign language for deaf people (and the risks of going without): Evidence from deaf signers

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09 July 2012

The Trent Comprehensive Local Research Network – an overview

Presenter(s): Janet Boothroyd
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

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18 June 2012

Training-induced plasticity measured using auditory steady-state responses

Presenter(s): Dr Karolina Kluk-de-Kort
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

CANCELLED

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30 April 2012

Designing Therapy Around The Patient

Presenter(s): Debbie Featherstone
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

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26 March 2012

Brain reorganisation following cochlea implantation

Presenter(s): Associate Professor Douglas Hartley
Time: 16.00 – 17.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

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23 January 2012

The TEACH study – improving cognition with auditory training

Presenter(s): Dr Helen Henshaw
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

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16 January 2012

Hearing, balance and vision research at the Leeds Institute of Diagnostics and Therapeutics, University of Leeds

Presenter(s): Dr Nick Thyer
Time: 16.00 – 17.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

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09 January 2012

Patterns of hearing loss and tinnitus

Presenter(s): Christine Tan
Time: 13.00 – 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Tinnitus is strongly linked with some form of hearing impairment, but we still do not know what (1) defects are effective triggers of tinnitus and (2) why tinnitus only affects some, and not all, who have damaged hearing. This study proposes that people with tinnitus may have unique inner ear defects that are not present in people who are hearing impaired but do not have tinnitus. Frequency selectivity (Iso-Forward Masking Contours) and compression (Temporal Masking Contours) were measured in two groups of hearing-impaired listeners; those with tinnitus and those without tinnitus. The two hearing-impaired groups had similar average thresholds and were of similar age. The results indicate that the tinnitus group had comparatively better measures of frequency selectivity and a stronger presence of compression compared to the group without tinnitus. The findings suggest better outer hair cell function in the tinnitus group. This means that other defects such as inner hair cell or cochlear nerve damage may be the dominant cause of the hearing impairment in the tinnitus group. We speculate that such patterns of auditory dysfunction may be the main triggers for the perception of tinnitus.

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