Seminars

Members of the general public are welcome to attend our seminars. However space is limited so if you would like to attend, please ring Sandra Smith at least 24 hours prior to the seminar on 0115 823 2634 to reserve a place. If Sandra Smith is unavailable contact Jan Kelly on 0115 823 2617 or contact reception on 0115 823 2600.

09 December 2013

Shared decision making and patient-audiologist interaction

Presenter(s): Dr Ariane Laplante-Lévesque
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

No Abstract available 

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25 November 2013

Reviewing the challenges of assessing functional or structural MRI in a clinical trial

Presenter(s):
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

No Abstract Available 

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04 November 2013

Hidden Hearing Loss: A Major Public Health Issue?

Presenter(s): Christopher Plack
Time: 13.00 - 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Dramatic results from recent animal experiments suggest that moderate noise exposure can cause substantial permanent damage to the auditory nerve that is not detected by standard hearing tests. A large number of people, probably millions in the UK alone, are exposed to occupational and recreational noise levels similar to, or greater than, those used in the animal experiments. There is some evidence that people with a history of noise exposure, but with normal hearing as measured by pure tone audiometry, have perceptual deficits on tasks such as hearing speech in noisy backgrounds. This “hidden” loss may also be associated with tinnitus and hyperacusis. In the talk I will describe the rationale and research plan for a recently awarded MRC programme grant that aims to provide a comprehensive account of the physiological bases and perceptual consequences of hidden hearing loss in humans. I will also present animal and human pilot data based on the “frequency-following response;” an electrophysiological measure of neural temporal coding.

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21 October 2013

Acquired and developmental synaesthesia

Presenter(s): Professor Jamie Ward
Time: 13.00 - 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Synaesthesia refers to atypical perceptual experiences that are in some respects 'extra': thus a sound may trigger a visual as well as an auditory experience.  The stimulus that triggers synaesthesia is termed an inducer and the experience itself is termed the concurrent.  Sounds have long been known to act as inducers of synaesthesia, notably of visual experiences.  This can occur developmentally: it emerges early in life, it is not linked to obvious impairments, but is linked to biological differences (genetic and brain structure).  It can also occur in acquired form as a result of, say, blindness.  Until recently, it was less clear whether sounds ever act as a synaesthetic concurrent.  However, it has now been shown that visual motion/flash triggers sounds in some developmental cases.  It is also possible that auditory experiences are elicited from sensori-motor inducers and this may conceivably make a contribution in some cases of tinnitus.

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24 June 2013

Internet interventions and health self-management - CANCELLED

Presenter(s): Dr Adam Geraghty
Time: 13.00 - 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Research on the use of the internet to self-manage a broad array of symptoms is increasing rapidly. In this talk I will discuss what internet interventions are and are not, when and where they might be helpful, and issues to consider when planning development. I will then explore two example internet interventions currently being developed by our team at the University of Southampton. The first, ‘Balance Retraining’ is a structured internet-based Vestibular Rehabilitation (VR) intervention designed for adults over 50. This project extends a successful programme of work examining VR booklets in primary care. The second, ‘H-Paths’ is an intervention designed specifically for primary care patients experiencing distress. It combines mindfulness-based approaches with behavioural activation and is being co-built with patients. I will conclude by discussing the future of internet interventions and outlining some areas of caution.

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10 June 2013

Cortical processing of the natural statistics of self-generated sounds in the primate auditory system using MRI-guided electrophysiology

Presenter(s): Yukiko Kikuchi
Time: 13.00 - 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

The brain is equipped with a system that can incorporate the external world. The statistics relating to natural signals are known to share many similarities to those of our own physiological signals, such as heart rate, neuronal firing rates and brain oscillations. Interaction between the brain and the external environment facilitates the emergence of new capacities and novel behaviours due to optimisation of the brain’s systems. I will investigate the interaction between the neuronal responses and regularities observed in external natural auditory signals, particularly self-generated sounds such as vocalisation, speech and music. In this talk, I will use a primate model system to demonstrate and discuss the cortical representation and pathways of prominent features observed in natural sounds, e.g., rhythm, pitch and voice, and how interaction between the cortical system and natural sounds can influence our behaviours.

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03 June 2013

Studies on patient journey, hearing disability acceptance and stages-of-change in people with hearing disability

Presenter(s): Dr Vinaya Manchaiah
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract
Person with hearing impairment (PHI) and their communication partners (CPs) have a range of experiences and milestones before, during and after their audiological assessment and/or rehabilitation sessions. The term ‘patient journey’ refers to understanding the experiences and the processes the patient goes through during the course of the disease and the treatment regime. In this talk, series of studies done to further develop the Ida Institute journey models of PHI and CPs and the potential uses of these models will be discussed. In addition, two studies (which are by products of a recent failed clinical trial) with focus on ‘hearing disability acceptance’ and ‘stages-of-change’ of people with hearing disability who are not actively seeking help will be discussed. Overall, this talk aims to highlight the importance of ‘process evaluation’ in understanding hearing disability
 

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08 April 2013

More from Music: development and evaluation of a music rehabilitation programme with adult cochlear

Presenter(s): Dr Rachel Van Besouw
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Many cochlear implant (CI) users wish to enjoy music but are dissatisfied by its quality as perceived through their implant. Although there is evidence to suggest that training can improve CI users’ perception and appraisal of music, provision of interactive music rehabilitation materials that have been developed with and tested by CI users remains limited. In response to this need, an ‘interactive music awareness programme’ is being developed with adult CI users.

A prototype was developed with feedback from a series of focus groups and music workshops. Twenty-one adult CI users were subsequently recruited to take part in a 24-week randomised controlled crossover trial of the prototype; a programme of 24 x 30 minute computer-based sessions with applications that enable the user to create and manipulate music.

The treatment group received the programme first and completed two sessions per week, followed by a 12-week retention of learning phase during which the control group used the programme. Both groups were assessed at the start (T1), half-way through (T2) and at the end of the trial (T3). Outcome measures included melodic contour identification (MCI), instrument recognition and speech-in-noise perception. Adherence data and feedback for each of the sessions were also collected using an online survey system. Sixteen participants attended all three assessment appointments and 14 of these completed ≥20 sessions.

There were significant time/group interactions for the speech-in-noise and MCI measures at T2, with the treatment group showing greater improvement. However, at T2 and T3 an increase in MCI for the control group could not be observed due to ceiling effects. The time/group interaction for instrument recognition approached significance, and both groups statistically significantly improved in instrument recognition following the 12 week period in which they used the programme. At T3 outcome measures for the treatment group were not statistically significantly different from T2.

Feedback from the trial is being used to improve and extend the programme, which is currently under development as an online resource. In this talk I will present results from the trial, findings from qualitative analysis of user feedback, the changes that we are making to the programme and our plans for evaluating the online version.

This research is supported by Arts & Humanities Research Council grants AH/H039392/1 and AH/K002880/1.

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04 February 2013

Which children should be considered candidates for cochlear implantation?

Presenter(s): Dr Rosie Lovett
Time: 13.00 - 14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

It can be difficult to judge whether a young child with hearing impairment will receive more benefit from cochlear implants or acoustic hearing aids. In England and Wales, only children with profound, or borderline severe-to-profound, hearing impairment are eligible for cochlear implantation. In order to assess whether this policy is optimal, I am conducting a longitudinal study to compare outcomes for children with cochlear implants and children with acoustic hearing aids.

Seventy-one children are taking part in the study. Twenty-seven children use bilateral cochlear implants and have severe or profound hearing impairment.  Forty-four children use bilateral acoustic hearing aids and have hearing impairment ranging from mild to profound. Outcome measures include tests of the ability to understand speech in quiet and in noise, tests of the ability to localise sources of sound, and assessments of spoken language skill. Children are assessed when they join the study (aged 3 to 6 years) and again a year later.

I will present the results of the first assessments and interim results from the second assessments. The data have been analysed using a method developed by Boothroyd (1993). For each outcome measure, a regression function was used to characterise the relationship between unaided hearing level and performance for children with acoustic hearing aids. The distribution of scores for implanted children was used to calculate, for a newly-diagnosed child with a known hearing level, the odds of better performance with implants than with hearing aids. A criterion of candidacy for cochlear implantation can be defined as the most advantageous hearing level for which the odds of better performance with implants exceed an acceptable ratio, such as 4 to 1. I will discuss our findings in the context of healthcare policy in the UK and abroad.

Reference
Boothroyd, A. (1993). Profound Deafness. In R. Tyler (Ed.), Cochlear implants: audiological foundations (pp. 1-33): Singular Publishing Group.

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