Seminars

Members of the general public are welcome to attend our seminars. However space is limited so if you would like to attend, please ring Sandra Smith at least 24 hours prior to the seminar on 0115 823 2634 to reserve a place. If Sandra Smith is unavailable contact Jan Kelly on 0115 823 2617 or contact reception on 0115 823 2600.

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05 October 2015

Dynamic consent: reactions from participants

Presenter(s): Dr Harriet Teare
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract 

TBC

 

Biography
Harriet is a researcher at the Centre for Health, Law and Emerging Technologies (HeLEX), at the University of Oxford. Her research interests relate to the role of participants in medical research, and improving governance infrastructure to support communication and interactive engagement. Harriet contributes to a number of specific research projects, including providing research governance and ethical support to the DIRECT project – an IMI-JU funded collaboration exploring stratification in Type 2 diabetes, the Rudy project – a research network for rare diseases of the blood, bone and joints, and the Genetics Clinic of the Future – a Horizon 2020 project mapping the complex challenges that will need to be tackled to introduce genome sequencing more widely into the clinic.

Harriet obtained a DPhil in Chemistry from Merton College, Oxford, and previously worked as a senior policy advisor at Cancer Research UK, focusing on policy issues relating to research and public health.

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28 September 2015

Development of a passive MEG stimulus for measurement of the binaural masking level difference

Presenter(s): Dr Lauren Gascoyne
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract 

No abtract available at this tme.

 

Biography
I completed my undergraduate degree in Psychology and Business Administration at Aston University in Birmingham, and then went on to do my PhD in auditory perception in MEG at the Aston Brain Centre, supervised by Dr Caroline Witton and Professor Paul Furlong.  My thesis focused on the development of a passive stimulus, designed for use with children, to measure a neural index of tonal perceptibility when presented both in- and out-of-phase over background white noise.  After completing my PhD I went on to work for a short while as a postdoc at Aston studying MEG resting state in children with Dyslexia, before moving to the Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre at Nottingham University.  Here I am working on various projects, including using MEG to examine the neural basis of Schizophrenia.

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09 September 2015

Top 10 research priorities for mild-moderate hearing loss research:

Presenter(s): Dr Helen Henshaw
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Results from A James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership

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07 September 2015

Self Help – The ethos and impact

Presenter(s): Paige Bramley
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract

Self Help UK is a unique organisation centred around self-help and self-care.  The presentation will give an overview of the work we currently deliver and the impact this has to individuals, carers and the city and county healthcare system.

Bio

Paige has extensive experience of community development including 25 years in the voluntary sector as an employee and volunteer.  Current role, Training and Development Officer, Self Help UK.

 

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01 September 2015

Face training in acquired prosopagnosia

Presenter(s): Dr Jodie Davies-Thompson
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Abstract 

No Abstract Available at this time.

 

Biography

Jodie conducted her Masters and PhD at the University of York with Tim Andrews, where she used fMRI to examine face processing in healthy subjects. She then moved to the University of British Columbia where she worked with Jason Barton, where she used investigated ways in which training can facilitate face recognition in prosopagnosia and the neural effects of this training.  Whilst there, she also examined the neural plasticity of the visual system in unusual patient populations (including, achiasma, and prosopmetamorphopsia). Last year, she moved to the University of Trento in Italy, where she shifted her focus to examine neural plasticity in the blind and the deaf. She recently received a Marie Curie grant to further explore cross-modal plasticity in the Deaf.

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20 July 2015

Measuring ‘hearing-related’ quality of life

Presenter(s): A Goman
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Seminar info
Generic quality of life questionnaires such as the EuroQol and Health Utilities Index summarize a respondent’s health related quality of life in terms of a ‘utility’ value where 1 indicates “perfect health” and 0 corresponds to being “dead”. These questionnaires are used to infer the ‘effectiveness’ component in cost-effectiveness ratios. However, in practice, these questionnaires lack sensitivity to hearing related difficulties and are particularly insensitive to the benefits of binaural hearing. Thus complicating policy-making for bilateral cochlear implantation.

This talk will highlight the need for a new measure that is sensitive to hearing difficulties and specifically the benefits afforded by binaural listening. The development and validation of a new measure - the York Hearing Related Quality of Life questionnaire (YHRQL) - will be described. The YHRQL is sensitive to binaural hearing and also adheres to the principles of economic evaluation. As such it has the potential to be used in cost-effectiveness analyses as a preference-based self-report measure of 'hearing-related' quality of life.

Biography
Adele Goman recently completed her PhD in Psychology and is now a research co-ordinator at the University of York where she is investigating spatial listening. She is interested in the impact of hearing loss and the effectiveness of interventions. Her research has focused on the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of bimodal aiding and bilateral cochlear implantation for profoundly-deafened adults in the United Kingdom.

For more information: https://www.york.ac.uk/psychology/staff/postdocs/agm/

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29 June 2015

‘listening-related effort and fatigue in young adults and children’

Presenter(s):
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Brief information:

Individuals with hearing loss commonly report effortful listening and fatigue due to (but not limited to) degraded sensory input. A sensitive measure of effort and fatigue would be of value to Audiologists in determining intervention success, and would help to provide a more comprehensive picture of the disability associated with hearing loss. While little is known about listening-related effort and fatigue in children with hearing loss, these factors may contribute to their generally poorer academic achievement in comparison to normal-hearing counterparts. In this talk, I will present data from my PhD which aims to examine effort and fatigue-related changes over time during a listening task in both young adults and children (aged 8-11 years).

Short bio:

I'm a final-year PhD student at the University of Manchester. I earned a BSc (first-class) honours degree in Psychology from the University of Manchester before pursuing my PhD. My current research is on listening effort in the child and young adult population. My PhD research goals are twofold: (i) Design a novel paradigm for measuring listening effort in young adults and children (aged 8 -11 years) which more closely resembles naturalistic speech processing (i.e., using more complex, extended speech materials), and (ii) investigating what insights can be gained from using pupillometry to measure listening effort and fatigue in the young adult and child population.

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03 June 2015

Cochlear implants in adverse listening conditions: Importance of visual speech information

Presenter(s): Dr Paula Stacey
Time: 12.30 -13.30
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Seeing the faces of talkers helps people to understand speech. We know that “visual speech” information (the information obtained from seeing the face of a talker) improves speech perception both for people with normal hearing when faced with noisy listening conditions, and for people with cochlear implants when listening in quiet. It is also well established that people with cochlear implants face significant challenges when listening to speech in noisy environments. What has been subject to less study, however, is the extent to which people with cochlear implants benefit from visual speech information when listening in noise. This talk will be structured around two main questions, (1) Does the benefit obtained from visual speech information vary according to nature of the auditory signal?, and (2) How is the ability to locate a talking face affected by the nature of the auditory signal?
Biography
Paula completed her PhD on “Studies of auditory training for adult users of cochlear implants” in 2006, and has since worked as a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer at Nottingham Trent University.

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11 May 2015

Have cochlear implant; won’t have to travel

Presenter(s): Dr Helen Cullington
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

Abstract:

Many resources are required to provide post-operative care to patients who receive a cochlear implant. The implant service commits to lifetime follow-up, which may be up to 100 years for a baby. The patient commits to regular adjustment and rehabilitation appointments in the first year and annual follow-up appointments thereafter. These services are provided at specialist tertiary centres which may be several hours away from the patient’s home necessitating travelling expense, time off work and family disruption. Currently UK implant centres review patients on a clinician-led schedule; this means that review appointments can occur that provide little benefit to the patient. Making this care pathway patient-centred instead will provide a more efficient service and allow more timely identification of issues.

I will describe a person-centred long-term follow-up pathway for cochlear implant users offering a triple approach of remote and self-monitoring, self-adjustment of devices and a personalised online or smartphone intervention package for testing their own hearing at home, information, self-rehabilitation, advice, equipment training and troubleshooting. Remote care will take place in the patient’s home.

Potential benefits for the patient are:
- more stable hearing (problems identified and resolved quicker)
- better hearing (ability to fine tune when away from clinic)
- convenience of not travelling to routine appointments
- reduction of travel cost and time, time off work and disruption to family life
- increased confidence to manage own hearing
- greater equality in service delivery

It will also mean that the clinic has greater resources (time, money, space) to see complex cases and the expanding population of new patients.

 

Biography
Helen Cullington is a clinician and researcher working at the University of Southampton Auditory Implant Service. She has more than 20 years’ experience in cochlear implants, having worked on several implant programmes within the United Kingdom and the United States, including House Ear Institute in Los Angeles.

Helen’s first degree was in Physics followed by an MSc in Audiology at the University of Southampton in 1993. Helen was captivated by cochlear implants – the use of technology to improve people’s lives. She began working in cochlear implants immediately, as an Audiological Scientist on the implant programme in Middlesbrough initially and then from 1997 at the University of Southampton. She then worked in House Ear Institute in California, USA from 2001 to 2004, leaving House to begin a PhD at University of California, Irvine. Helen returned to the University of Southampton Auditory Implant Service in 2007; she splits her time between seeing patients and working on research projects.

Helen has special interests in bilateral implants and the use of telemedicine to follow up cochlear implant users.

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20 April 2015

Ototoxicity: A journey from Assessment of need to Assessment of current practice

Presenter(s): Dr Ghady Al-Malky
Time: 13.00 -14.00
Location: NHBRU, Meeting Room 1

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